1909 Rudge-Whitworth No 27 Crescent Road Racer

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This is an entirely new departure in popular-priced speed machines, and having been tested against every other well-known Road Racer is admitted to be livelier and faster than any of them.

– 1908 Rudge-Whitworth catalogue extract

By dropping their prices and introducing lightweight machines, Rudge-Whitworth managed to beat the downturn in sales experienced by the rest of the cycle trade around the turn of the century. Building on the popularity of their bicycles, they became the leading cycle manufacturer. By the end of the decade, their road racers and path racers  were the top sellers, a position earned by the many racing successes enjoyed by the company.

1909 Rudge-Whitworth No 27 Crescent Road Racer

Downward sloping top tube with 2.5″ drop

34″ Standover height (dropping to 31.5″)

Front rim brake with dwarf lever. Coaster brake on rear.

24″ Frame

26″ Wheels

Frame No 530998

(Now sold)

 

 

 

 

 

1908 RUDGE-WHITWORTH CATALOGUE EXTRACTS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

RUDGE-WHITWORTH LUBRICATORS

(Bottom Bracket & Hubs)

 

 

1908 RUDGE-WHITWORTH CATALOGUE EXTRACTS

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Royal Family’s kids rode Rudge-Whitworths. Prince Edward, son of King George V and Queen Mary, was created Prince of Wales on his 16th birthday, on 23rd June 1910. (The above photo is dated September, 1910). He was invested on 13th July 1911, at Caernarfon Castle. Edward became King Edward VIII on 20th January 1936. On his abdication, on 10th December 1936, the throne passed to his brother, King George VI – grandfather of the present Prince of Wales.

King Edward VII ruled from January to November, 1901. He was Queen Victoria’s oldest son.