1950s Child’s Invalid Tricycle with hand controls

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1950s Child’s Invalid Tricycle with hand controls

LENGTH: 48″

WIDTH: 19″

HEIGHT: 23″

Wheels: 11 x 1 3/4″ (tyres 47-222)

This 1950s invalid tricycle is interesting in its design, using technology that was invented in the 1860s to power and steer it by hand. It is believed to have been a bespoke build for a particular family, and the engineering involved in its construction is first class. The centre of gravity is low, to prevent tipping over. It is fully operational, as can be seen in my short video further down the page.

 

 

HAND CONTROLS

SELF-PROPELLED INVALID CARRIAGES OVER THE AGES

The first tricycles used for invalids were bath chairs (above). Meanwhile, lever-operated tricycles became more refined. The tricycle below is not an invalid carriage, but a tricycle motivated by hand levers before pedals came into use.

The hand lever operation was incorporated into the first designs for invalid tricycles (below) in the 1890s.

World War One resulted in many thousands of invalids and all sorts of tricycles were developed to cope with the demand. The one below is pushed by hand…

…while the next one is pushed by a dog.

The chain-driven hand operated 1920s Monet Goyon, below, was common on the roads of France during the 1920s.

The Poiriet, below, was operated by hand – the steering wheel is pushed backwards and forwards to motivate it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ECCENTRIC REAR AXLE

 

 

STEERING LEVER AND LINKAGE

 

HAND-BRAKE DIRECT ONTO REAR WHEEL